Is your bank or credit union for or against you?

Back around Christmas time I wrote a post about the holiday loan offered by our local credit union. I gave plenty of reasons at that time why you shouldn’t get one of these loans.

But then they came back to surprise me with a vacation loan advertised on their digital sign. Seriously? A loan to go on vacation? They advertise it by showing a beach and saying “it’s only a vacation loan away.” This is accompanied by a “spring into a home equity loan” ad. I’ve also seen one advertising their great rates on car loans.

You know what I haven’t seen? Anything about savings rates, investing, or getting into better financial shape. I had them advertise Financial Peace University once on their digital sign and it worked out great. That was until I got a call telling me they had to take it down because it was a conflict of interest because they wanted their members coming to them to discuss financial problems. Hmmm, maybe for consolidation loan?

All of this begs the question, is your bank or credit union for or against you? Do they have your best interest in mind when they offer you a product or service or are they just trying to maximize their shareholder value, pad their pockets, or make a quick buck?

Banks and credit unions make money when you borrow money and not so much you save it. They can be extremely giving when they’ve got incentive.

Keep this in mind the next time you’re bank or credit union has something new to offer you. Consider how they’ll end up coming out ahead in the end before accepting anything.

What crazy debt products have you seen offered? Do you have any stories about your bank or credit union where they helped you get ahead? Leave them in the comments below.

Photo by 401(K) 2013

How to Make Christmas Last All Year Long

Loan Featured

Loan 1Loan FeaturedLoan 3Loan 4If your holiday season is anything like ours, it usually involves putting up holiday decorations, trying to figure out what to get people, and running all over to our different Christmas obligations. It seems crazy at the time, but then the day after Christmas life kind of goes back to normal and it’s a little sad that it’s all over. Well, if you want to be reminded of Christmas all year long, I’ve got the perfect solution!

You can now walk on down to your friendly neighborhood banking institution and get a holiday loan. For the low, low interest rate of 12%, you can be reminded of the times you had and the things you bought during the Christmas season every month when you write your check to the bank or credit union.

Maybe you thought you just stepped into the twilight zone. This blog is still about saving money and getting a loan of any kind is NOT the best way to save for anything. Just about the time you would get this wonderful holiday loan paid off, it will be time for Christmas once again. Since you won’t have any money next year since you used it to pay back the loan, you’ll be stuck in the same situation next year. Never fear, holiday loan to the rescue!

I’ve got a better plan and it will work even if you haven’t been saving all year. Although it may require some…wait for it…SACRIFICE! If money is tight this year, try out the tips below.

  • Determine who you need to buy gifts for. Sorry, but this year, the postman, hairdresser, and the neighbor’s kids won’t be getting anything from you. You might even want to cut out nephews, nieces, cousins, brothers and sisters. If you have kids of your own, you’re siblings might welcome not having to purchase anything for them if you don’t purchase anything for their kids in exchange. Just tell them “instead of buying stuff for each other’s kids, why don’t you take the money and spend it on your kids since you probably know what they like better anyhow.”
  • Are you crafty? Ever heard of Pinterest? This could save you quite a bit and the gift will probably mean a lot more since you put your time into it.
  • Create a Christmas budget. It doesn’t have to be complicated. Just determine how much you can safely spend on Christmas this year without throwing your financial world into chaos or causing you to accrue debt. Then write down how you’ll divide that money between everyone on your list. This might be a good opportunity to find additional people you won’t be shopping for.
  • Don’t buy things for yourself when you see a deal! Pretty easy to say, not always as easy to do.
  • If things are really tight, just be honest with family and friends. They will most likely be understanding and may even be grateful that they don’t have to shop for you. You might even find that others are in the same situation, but were just afraid to say it. If nothing else, just going to Christmas events with family and friends is oftentimes all they’re really hoping for.
  • Start saving for next year! If you thought you could afford paying back that Christmas loan (which has a payment of a little over $106 a month), then you should be able to stash that money in a savings account so you’re ready for next year. You won’t just have $1200, but more like $1280. It might take some discipline, but if you can schedule it to come out of each paycheck, then you can make your discipline automatic.

The holiday season can be stressful enough as it is, don’t add to it by doing something you’ll regret the rest of the year.